Table of contents: VOL. 151, NO. 10 - May 16, 2005
COVER STORY
Getting fired during your peak earning years has always been scary. You'd scramble for a few months, but you'd find something. Today it's different. Get fired and you can scramble for years--and still find nothing. Welcome to the cold new world of the prematurely, involuntarily retired. (more)

Features
Volkswagen is in one of its periodic funks. But this time there's a plan to repair it for good. (more)
Banned from Wall Street, the former Telecom King wants to prove that he wasn't just a huckster. (more)
As rivals slash costs, the nation's best airline has to keep its edge--without wrecking morale. (more)
Our 13th annual playlist of upstarts changing the game. (more)
How China's best business school is rewiring the nation's economy. (more)
The first management class rose from poverty to the heights of capitalism. (more)
MBIA guarantees the safety of bonds that fund everything from the Eurotunnel to commercial aircraft to cities across America. A relentless short-seller charges that its business model isn't sound. Can he be right? (more)
Why can't corporations keep their customers' personal data secure? Inside the world of identity theft. (more)


Bing! While You Were Out

Brainstorming

Business Life




Apple's latest operating system upgrade--what, $129 again?--earns its stripes with tricks that Microsoft can't match, yet. But do you really need it? (more)
First

By playing all sides of the NYSE deal, Goldman Sachs sent a powerful message. Here's how it got so far ahead. (more)


The battle raging between satellite radio providers XM and Sirius began in the car and moved to the stars, with each company spending millions to snag the biggest celebrities, sports leagues, and deals with automakers and airlines. While Sirius may have bigger names, XM has better technology.  Here's how they stack up. (more)
Another front in the intellectual-property wars: Who gets the royalties for prayers on coffee mugs? (more)

Investing
Scalding emerging-markets stocks have cooled lately. They may not rebound for a while. (more)
Wall Street is worried about oil, interest rates, and a slowdown. But there are still opportunities to be found. (more)
Fund manager Frank Holmes argues it's not too late to find opportunities in natural resources. (more)

Like many pharma stocks, this one has been pounded--perhaps too much. (more)
The brewer's shares are going nowhere, and analysts are dubious--but not Buffett. (more)
Street Life
Value Driven
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