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Table of Contents:VOL. 158, NO. 4 - September 01, 2008
Special report: The business of style
King of cool
King of cool
J. Crew's Mickey Drexler reinvented a retailing icon. Now he's launching a new brand called Madewell. Downturns are not for wimps. By John Brodie 
The right address
Every city has one - a retail thoroughfare that houses the most exclusive stores. Here are some of the world's priciest streets, and the going rate to join the neighborhood. By Beth Kowitt 
Luxe in flux
The $270 billion luxury business thought it was recession-proof. But its growth is slowing, and anxiety is higher than a pair of Jimmy Choo pumps. Is an opulence backlash brewing? By Peter Gumbel 
Prada goes shopping - for money
The Milanese fashion house plans to raise cash by going public. But at what price? By Suzanne Kapner 
The style council, 2008
Nothing is more elegant than a fat bottom line, as the moguls, merchants, and master craftsmen in Fortune's second annual luxury portfolio will tell you. By Eugenia Levenson/Photographs by Ben Baker 
Features
The bottom line
The bottom line
Innovation isn't just for Google. How Kimberly-Clark gave birth to a hot new product. A Fortune 500 Series feature. By Jia Lynn Yang 
Looking for trouble
Richard Perry, hedge fund superstar, has made a specialty of investing in distress. Now his time has come. By Marcia Vickers 
Get a life!
Three coaches take our intrepid reporter in hand. By Paul Keegan 
First
The Deal
The Deal
How to solve the financial crisis? Play for time, pray for markets to turn. By Allan Sloan 
Harvest time
Across the Great Plains, American wheat farmers outsource cutting to custom harvesters with fleets of combines. By Ryan Derousseau 
The box office indicator
Strong ticket sales and weak markets go hand in hand. By Michal Lev-Ram 
The upside of failure
A new book, Billion Dollar Lessons, makes the point that failure yields far more wisdom than success. By Jia Lynn Yang 
Banking's French twist
France's BNP Paribas may be the bank least affected by the financial meltdown. By Telis Demos 
Value Driven
Our easy access to plastic is about to dry up - and with it our ability to fake living the good life. By Geoff Colvin 
Marketing
Programmers are figuring out how to save TV advertising from TiVo: Make commericals seem like content. By Suzanne Kapner 
Investing
Fastest-Growing Companies update
Fastest-Growing Companies update
Diet company NutriSystem, No. 1 on Fortune's 100 Fastest-Growing Companies list in 2007, is stalling in the economic slowdown. By Katie Benner 
These stocks are rolling
Railroads are benefiting from the global commodities boom - and the fact that trains are more fuel-efficient than trucks. By Paul R. La Monica 
Right on your money
More people are using reverse mortgages to unlock their home equity for retirement, but the costs are steep. By Eugenia Levenson 
Technology
A chip too far
A chip too far
Cutting-edge 'multi-core' microchips have gotten so complicated that companies from Microsoft to Apple to Intel say software writers can't keep up. The result could hurt computer sales. By Michael V. Copeland 
Genomes 'r' us
Pacific Biosciences says it will soon be able to decipher the genetic code faster and cheaper than ever. By Michael V. Copeland 
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