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Table of Contents:VOL. 158, NO. 9 - November 10, 2008
COVER STORY
Look who pays for the bailout
Look who pays for the bailout
Meet the HENRYs (high earners, not rich yet). They make $250,000-plus and get taxed to high heaven. And they're about to be socked again. By Shawn Tully with Joan Caplin 
THE ECONOMY IN CRISIS
Is buy-and-hold dead?
Is buy-and-hold dead?
The short answer: No. As grim as things look, here are three big reasons not to abandon your investing strategy. By Brian O'Keefe 
Can Larry Fink save Wall Street?
BlackRock's expertise in evaluating exotic securities has put its CEO at the center of the credit crisis. By Katrina Brooker 
The risk fallacy
The very systems the banks created to protect themselves are at the heart of the financial meltdown. By Nomi Prins 
Call this a crisis? Just wait
A bigger economic disaster in the making: 78 million baby-boomers eligible for Social Security and Medicare. By David M. Walker 
FEATURES
The mogul behind the predator
The mogul behind the predator
Neal Blue, CEO of defense contractor General Atomics, is famous for his sharp-elbowed business style. By Barney Gimbel 
The player
NBC hired Ben Silverman to reinvent television. Can he air anything as awesome as the Ben Silverman show? By Richard Siklos 
GREEN INVESTING
Cashing in on green energy
Cashing in on green energy
Solar, wind, and carbon-trading stocks may pay off bigtime for patient investors. By Brian Dumaine 
Doing well by clearing the air
Investing in carbon credits takes an appetite for risk and complexity. But this market is doing much better than most. By Marc Gunther 
Solar stocks for a rainy day
The industry has taken a beating in the market lately, but a few standouts may shine in the long run. By Michael V. Copeland 
Trying to catch the wind
Developers and turbine makers are scrambling to feed growing demand for power. By Todd Woody 
Finding the right fund
There are lots of choices, but many are new and untested. We discovered three with seasoning and size. By Eugenia Levenson 
FIRST
Smackdown!
Smackdown!
Comedy thrives when the markets swoon. By Jon Birger and Scott Cendrowski 
Whose space is MySpace?
A tell-all questions who really sold to News Corp. By Jessi Hempel 
A hit-driven Christmas
Toymakers hope a few standouts can rescue holiday sales. By Mina Kimes 
The Deal
Playing the blame game. By Allan Sloan 
Taming derivatives
Can free markets clean up the credit default swap mess? By Telis Demos 
World's Most Admired Companies
How breakfast food maker General Mills milks its products for margins. By Mina Kimes 
The Three-Minute Manager
How do I groom and keep talented employees? By Mina Kimes 
Where business is booming
Saskatchewan has 10,000 job openings. Bring your parka. By Jon Birger 
Value Driven
A return to thrift: Main Street should follow Wall Street when it comes to deleveraging. By Geoff Colvin 
The Best Advice I Ever Got
Christine Day, CEO of yoga apparel retailer Lululemon Athletica. 
Questions for ...
Virgin Group founder Sir Richard Branson answers fortune.com readers' queries - and some of our own. By Barney Gimbel 
TECHNOLOGY
Big tech goes bargain hunting
Big tech goes bargain hunting
Good news for corporate giants with billions in cash: All those startups with technology you coveted? Fire sale!!! By Michael V. Copeland 
Autodesk's cabinet of wonders
A tour of the software stalwart's new temple of industrial design. By Jeffrey M. O'Brien 
Hollyworld
Sumner Redstone's personal financial troubles aren't just his problem. They're his shareholders' too. By Richard Siklos 
LIFE AT THE TOP
Cool cars for tough times
Cool cars for tough times
Joy rider Sue Zesiger Callaway stages a supercar showdown. 
Stroke of genius
Golf icon Annika Sorenstam builds a business around her name. By Jessica Shambora 
Road Warrior
Laurence Franklin, CEO of Tumi. By Eugenia Levenson 
Book review
Two compilations of top songs and movies. By Daniel Okrent 
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